Technics EAH-TZ700 Review

Technics EAH-TZ700 Review

With the Technics EAH-TZ700, the Japanese high-end manufacturer Technics is raising in-ear monitoring to an audiophile-level, which, among other things, should impress with a frequency response of 3 to 100,000 Hz. The highlight: The small earplugs do not do this with a reusable system, but only with a single 10 mm small driver, whose frameless construction, including magnetic fluid and air control chamber, does not seem to shake anything. The in-ears are not a bargain, but maybe a recommendation.

PROS:

  • Premium build
  • There is no distortion in the sound
  • The closed-back design provides more privacy than open cans
  • Some film and television genres benefit from it

CONS:

  • Unpleasant musical tuning Ear pads become warm
  • Despite the generously padded headband, pressure builds up at the top of the head.
  • There is no padded storage case.

In-ear headphones often degenerate into an underappreciated supplement when buying a smartphone. The demand is also shrinking when it comes to listening habits. After all, streaming services provide more background soundtrack for everyday use than playlists for enjoyable listening. More attention is paid to functionality than to sound. If you also want to do without the annoying cable, you can treat yourself to Bluetooth headphones, if possible, even with noise-canceling to suppress annoying background noise. The Technics EAH-TZ700 cannot serve this purpose, but it shines with its sound, comfort, and high quality, which you can benefit from at home and in the DJ booth. But how is it worth it?

Details

In the outer packaging of the cardboard box, I find a matt black and elegant-looking box with a partially lacquered Technics strap. When I open it, a synthetic leather case with an embossed Technics logo welcomes me, which transports the two very elegant earphones, which weigh just 3.5 g, and are shockproof.

The silver brand lettering stands out on the metallic gray surface, as does the golden MMCX socket on which one of the two cables supplied clicks firmly into place. Technics donated two cables of equal length, not sheathed, with a non-symmetrical cable with a gold-plated 3.5 mm jack plug for smartphones and conventional headphone outputs. The symmetrical cable and the four-pole plug require special high-end players.

Fitting pieces that are adequate for the respective ear are part of the good tone. Accordingly, Technics includes two sets, round and oval, in four different sizes each. Slipped over the trapezoidal exit of the sound outlet, they sit tight, and the in-ears are secure and precisely fitting in the ear canal.

The technology

Technics manufactures the cylinders of the listeners from magnesium, which ends in a titanium sound outlet reserved for the 10 mm small drivers. According to the manufacturer, the most advanced technology is hidden inside, based on the unique, frameless driver construction, which is separated from a magnetic fluid and is intended to prevent vibrations and distortions. In addition, the perfect control of the airflow in a closed air control chamber via a special aluminum membrane ensures a more detailed and spatial image.

Specs

As already mentioned, the Technics EAH-TZ700 nominally manages the frequency response from 3 Hz to 100 kHz with just one driver. To ensure that you are properly heard even on less powerful headphone outputs, the impedance is low at 37 ohms, and the sensitivity is 102 dB / mW. In line with its 100 mW power, the Technics EAH-TZ700 will probably provide a loud, high-resolution sound in the following practical test.

Practice

Thanks to its very small housing shape and the low weight of 3.5 g per capsule (without cable), the EAH-TZ700 is hardly noticeable in the ear canal. Of course, the in-ears also benefit from the different earpieces. They ensure the perfect fit and security without uncomfortable pressure even with faster head movements, such as during sports. Although the attachments snap tightly onto the conical sound outlet, they can be changed quite easily. It’s just a shame that there is no space reserved for two replacement pads in the case because the carrying case offers enough space. In general, the tiny EAH-TZ700 should be stowed in the pouch provided for it to be transported safely and the cable protected from fretting and breakage.

Sound

Playing MP3s on the Technics EAH-TZ700 is like throwing pearls in front of pigs. Accordingly, the test also requires a suitable player, such as the FiiO M11 mobile high-resolution player provided by Technics, with tracks in wav or better in lossless FLAC format.

Since the in-ears sympathize with the music of any style, be it pop, rock, jazz, or classical music, and should reproduce their sub-bass or crystal clear highs naturally and uncensored, I randomly scroll through the library with over 1,600 songs. The first playtests show that the EAH-TZ700 depicts all production details like a magnifying glass, including background noises such as the keystrokes on the keyboard in Peter Gabriel’s “The Boy In The Bubble.”

You can hear the music in its entirety in a way you have probably never had it injected directly into your ear before. Completely encapsulated, I dive into the spatial music world without distraction. Classics like America’s “A Horse With No Name” or Pink Floyd’s “Another Brick In The Wall” have often benefited from the analog studio production at the time. Warm basses and crystal clear highs are in harmony without stealing each other’s show. Elvis Presley’s “Fever” gives me goosebumps, first of all, the deep plucked double bass carpet, including the background noise of the studio technology at that time, on which Elvis’ voice presented itself as if he were standing directly in front of me. But the EAH-TZ700 also feels very comfortable on electronic terrain, the best example being Deadmau5 “Whispers,” whose creaky deep bass the drivers reproduce undistorted and without vibrations even at loud volume.

This will surely make DJ hearts beat a little faster. I take completely new facets from tracks that you know from the radio, like Sia’s “Cheap Thrills” Elvis Presley’s “Fever” gives me goosebumps, first of all, the deep plucked double bass carpet including the background noise of the studio technology at that time, on which Elvis’ voice presented itself as if he were standing right in front of me. But the EAH-TZ700 also feels very comfortable on electronic terrain, the best example being Deadmau5 “Whispers,” whose creaky deep bass the drivers reproduce undistorted and without vibrations even at loud volume. This will surely make DJ hearts beat a few BPM.

I take completely new facets from tracks that you know from the radio, like Sia’s “Cheap Thrills” Elvis Presley’s “Fever” gives me goosebumps, first of all, the deep plucked double bass carpet including the background noise of the studio technology at that time, on which Elvis’ voice presented itself as if he were standing directly in front of me. But the EAH-TZ700 also feels very comfortable on electronic terrain, the best example being Deadmau5 “Whispers,” whose creaky deep bass the drivers reproduce undistorted and without vibrations even at loud volume. This will surely make DJ hearts beat a few BPM. Again, I take completely new facets from tracks that you know from the radio, like Sia’s “Cheap Thrills,” as if he was standing right in front of me.

But the Technics EAH-TZ700 also feels very comfortable on electronic terrain, the best example being Deadmau5 “Whispers,” whose creaky deep bass the drivers reproduce undistorted and without vibrations even at loud volume. This will surely make DJ hearts beat a few BPM. I take completely new facets from tracks that you know from the radio, like Sia’s “Cheap Thrills,” as if he was standing right in front of me. But the EAH-TZ700 also feels very comfortable on electronic terrain, the best example being Deadmau5 “Whispers,” whose creaky deep bass the drivers reproduce undistorted and without vibrations even at loud volume. This will surely make DJ hearts beat a few BPM. I take completely new facets from tracks that you know from the radio, like Sia’s “Cheap Thrills.”

However, the listeners are also very honest, so that their homogeneous sound only benefits from a high-quality recording in a high-resolution file format. On the other hand, if I plug my iPhone into the EAH-TZ700, it reveals the compressed truth. Nevertheless, it sounds much more detailed and homogeneous than conventional in-ears, such as my Earpods Pro. But the purchase of the noble in-ears is not worthwhile for mobile use alone, especially since they shield a lot from the environment without an ambient mode of active noise canceling. Rather, they speak for audiophile music enjoyment at home, where you consciously and exclusively devote yourself to the music. The EAH-TZ-700 provides true head cinema thanks to its spatial representation and very good shielding. A job in the DJ booth also benefits from the latter,

Conclusion

Technics is celebrating an impressive debut in in-ear headphones with the EAH-TZ700. A newly developed 10 mm small driver with a frequency response of 3 to 100,000 Hz is located in the very noble-looking metallic gray and only 3.5 g lightweight magnesium housing natural, homogeneous, distortion-free, and vibration-free signal mapping.

In the listening test, this is shown, regardless of the music style being played, in a high-resolution, very spatial sound that is not afraid of extremely deep bass or crystal-clear highs. In addition, thanks to their perfect fit with the various included ear tips in four sizes and two shapes, the listeners seal off their surroundings very well. The tiny in-ears are therefore primarily recommended for enjoyable listening but also for cueing in the DJ booth. However, to be able to play out all possible nuances of the driver, a corresponding player is required, preferably an HR player, equipped with uncompressed audio files.

Technics EAH-TZ700 Review
Technics EAH-TZ700 Review

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